ichthyologist:

Larval Common Black Dragonfish (Idiacanthus atlanticus)


The eyes of the larval black dragonfish are carried on long stalks. This is believed to increase its field of vision, assisting in finding prey and avoiding predators. As it matures, the fish’s eyes retreat into a socket. 

Images © Australian Museum

Deep sea critters are THE. COOLEST. 

284 notes

allcreatures:

Flapjack (or pancake) devilfish (or octopus) are rarely seen swimming in open water, preferring to flatten themselves on the bottom, when the reason for their name becomes apparent.
Deep sea wildlife photo gallery by Lia Barrett

it’s a good thing I contribute to this blog because otherwise my personal tumblr would be constantly inundated with biology posts. 

allcreatures:

Flapjack (or pancake) devilfish (or octopus) are rarely seen swimming in open water, preferring to flatten themselves on the bottom, when the reason for their name becomes apparent.

Deep sea wildlife photo gallery by Lia Barrett

it’s a good thing I contribute to this blog because otherwise my personal tumblr would be constantly inundated with biology posts. 

438 notes

A beautifully made paper cut out video about what happens after a whale dies and the different critters that thrive off of a “whale fall”. SO GOOD. 

Did you know that one of the hypotheses for the evolution (and ability to live) of the deep sea vent communities is that the organisms that thrive in them were originally evolved to live off of whale falls? Hence the ability for these creatures to continue even though deep sea vents will often suddenly stop or start without warning. 

NOW YOU KNOW.  

(Source: radiolab.org)

COOL DEEP SEA THINGS: 
Cold Seeps, which can look like underwater lakes (SO COOL) are seepages of hydrogen sulfide or methane that develop communities able to live off of the chemicals provided therein (called chemosynthetic). Fan worms, mussels, and crustaceans can all survive in their own little ecosystem. Cold seeps are kind of like hydrothermal vents, but they tend to last longer and decline more gradually.

COOL DEEP SEA THINGS: 

Cold Seeps, which can look like underwater lakes (SO COOL) are seepages of hydrogen sulfide or methane that develop communities able to live off of the chemicals provided therein (called chemosynthetic). Fan worms, mussels, and crustaceans can all survive in their own little ecosystem. Cold seeps are kind of like hydrothermal vents, but they tend to last longer and decline more gradually.

15 notes

Question. 
Goblin shark: Creepy shark or creepiest shark? 
My vote’s on the latter. It’s a deep-sea living critter, though, and those tend to look the most like nightmare fodder. 
VARIATION, GUYS. IT CAN MAKE THINGS LOOK FREAKING SCARY. 

Question. 

Goblin shark: Creepy shark or creepiest shark? 

My vote’s on the latter. It’s a deep-sea living critter, though, and those tend to look the most like nightmare fodder. 

VARIATION, GUYS. IT CAN MAKE THINGS LOOK FREAKING SCARY. 

96 notes

YAY colonial critters! This is a colonial siphonophore, Athorybia rosacea, made up of many individuals. 

Thanks to Sarah for the original link.

YAY colonial critters! This is a colonial siphonophore, Athorybia rosacea, made up of many individuals. 

Thanks to Sarah for the original link.

Sea Angel. This is actually a naked snail - no shell! And, these snails are so abundant and are consumed so widely that they have even been called the “potato chip” of the ocean. 

Thanks to Sarah for the original link.

Sea Angel. This is actually a naked snail - no shell! And, these snails are so abundant and are consumed so widely that they have even been called the “potato chip” of the ocean. 

Thanks to Sarah for the original link.

27 notes

Bioluminescence. Rock on!

(Source: ted.com)

2 notes

fuckyeahbiolum:

When something looks too good  to be true, it usually is. Take the case of the deep-sea siphonophore,  which makes red light to trap its prey. A close relative of the  jellyfish, it was recently discovered by a team of Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) researchers.
Like  all siphonophores, this unnamed species is what scientists call a  “superorganism”: an animal that grows by budding off highly specialized  structures, known as zooids. Each zooids performs a specific function,  such as feeding or reproduction.
This creature’s feeding zooids employ unique red “lures” at the tips of some tentacles to catch unwitting passers-by. To the  fish that fall for the alluring bait, the red fluorescent tip looks just  like a fat, juicy crustacean. The dangling blobs themselves are  harmless, but nearby tentacles are equipped with a battery of potent  stinging cells, that make quick work of the small fish.
Photophores  contained within the tips are responsible for producing the red light.  MBARI scientist Steven Haddock believes the lures are an adaptation for  living at depth, where food is scarce and fish are even scarcer.

fuckyeahbiolum:

When something looks too good to be true, it usually is. Take the case of the deep-sea siphonophore, which makes red light to trap its prey. A close relative of the jellyfish, it was recently discovered by a team of Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) researchers.

Like all siphonophores, this unnamed species is what scientists call a “superorganism”: an animal that grows by budding off highly specialized structures, known as zooids. Each zooids performs a specific function, such as feeding or reproduction.

This creature’s feeding zooids employ unique red “lures” at the tips of some tentacles to catch unwitting passers-by. To the fish that fall for the alluring bait, the red fluorescent tip looks just like a fat, juicy crustacean. The dangling blobs themselves are harmless, but nearby tentacles are equipped with a battery of potent stinging cells, that make quick work of the small fish.

Photophores contained within the tips are responsible for producing the red light. MBARI scientist Steven Haddock believes the lures are an adaptation for living at depth, where food is scarce and fish are even scarcer.

This image provided by NOAA shows a deep-sea chimaera. Chimaeras are most closely related to sharks, although their evolutionary lineage branched off from sharks nearly 400m years ago, and they have remained an isolated group ever since. According to scientists the lateral lines running across this chimaera are mechano-receptors that detect pressure waves (just like ears). The dotted-looking lines on the frontal portion of the face (near the mouth) are ampullae de lorenzini and they detect perturbations in electrical fields generated by living organisms.

This image provided by NOAA shows a deep-sea chimaera. Chimaeras are most closely related to sharks, although their evolutionary lineage branched off from sharks nearly 400m years ago, and they have remained an isolated group ever since. According to scientists the lateral lines running across this chimaera are mechano-receptors that detect pressure waves (just like ears). The dotted-looking lines on the frontal portion of the face (near the mouth) are ampullae de lorenzini and they detect perturbations in electrical fields generated by living organisms.

15 notes