cwnl:

Tarantula MRI Reveals Strange Double Heartbeat

Spider hearts may contract in a unique double beat. By placing tarantulas in a magnetic resonance imaging scanner, biologists from Edinburgh University made a video of a living spider’s beating heart.
“In the videos you can see the blood flowing through the heart and tantalizingly it looks as though there might be ‘double beating’ occurring; a distinct type of contraction which has never been considered before,” said Gavin Merrifield in a press release. Merrifield presented the research at the Society for Experimental Biology Annual Conference in Glasgow last month.
Merrifield and his colleagues used special MRI scanners, built for medical research on rats and mice, at the Glasgow Experimental MRI center, to measure heart rate and cardiac output in tarantulas. Most MRI technology is used purely for medicine, but it could branch out into new areas of biology.
“On the more academic side of things if we can link MRI brain scans with a spider’s behavior, and combine this with similar data from vertebrates, we may clarify how intelligence evolved,” Merrifield said.

Article Source: Wired

mri a spider? let’s be besties.

cwnl:

Tarantula MRI Reveals Strange Double Heartbeat

Spider hearts may contract in a unique double beat. By placing tarantulas in a magnetic resonance imaging scanner, biologists from Edinburgh University made a video of a living spider’s beating heart.

“In the videos you can see the blood flowing through the heart and tantalizingly it looks as though there might be ‘double beating’ occurring; a distinct type of contraction which has never been considered before,” said Gavin Merrifield in a press release. Merrifield presented the research at the Society for Experimental Biology Annual Conference in Glasgow last month.

Merrifield and his colleagues used special MRI scanners, built for medical research on rats and mice, at the Glasgow Experimental MRI center, to measure heart rate and cardiac output in tarantulas. Most MRI technology is used purely for medicine, but it could branch out into new areas of biology.

“On the more academic side of things if we can link MRI brain scans with a spider’s behavior, and combine this with similar data from vertebrates, we may clarify how intelligence evolved,” Merrifield said.

Article Source: Wired

mri a spider? let’s be besties.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

39 notes

BIOLOGY-RELATED GIFS ARE BETTER THAN HAPPY BABIES. 
Lookit that heart go!
If anyone has a source for this I’d be mighty obliged. 

BIOLOGY-RELATED GIFS ARE BETTER THAN HAPPY BABIES. 

Lookit that heart go!

If anyone has a source for this I’d be mighty obliged. 

(Source: sealrose)

80 notes

Stem cell hope for heart patients

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

Scientists have raised hope that stem cell therapy could provide significant relief for patients disabled by untreatable chest pain.

Patients with severe angina had stem cells from their blood injected into their heart.

The therapy, carried out by Chicago’s Northwestern University, halved the number of bouts of angina chest pain.

But UK experts have stressed the work is still at an early stage, and the potential longer benefit is unknown.

The procedure may also carry a risk: it is suspected of causing heart muscle damage in two patients, and others reported bone and chest pain.

The study, reported in the journal Circulation Research, was carried out on 167 patients with “refraction” angina, which does not respond to any standard treatment.

They were given high or low dose stem cell infusions, or a dummy injection.

A year on, patients in the low-dose group had an average of 6.3 episodes of pain a week, compared to 11 a week for those given the placebo jab.

It translates as going from being able to walk slowly to being able to ride a bike.”

Professor Douglas LosordoNorthwestern University

The length of time they were able to tolerate exercise also improved by 139 seconds after six months, compared to an improvement of 69 seconds for the placebo group.

There was no significant benefit from receiving a higher dose of stem cells.

Lead researcher Professor Douglas Losordo said: “The net difference in exercise tolerance is highly clinically significant, particularly in a patient population that is severely limited by symptoms.

“It translates as going from being able to watch television to being able to walk at a normal pace or going from being able to walk slowly to being able to ride a bike.”

Interesting article! Along with the heart patients area, there is this article on NPR that I remember hearing about a few weeks ago where doctors have come up with a no-pulse artificial heart that makes you reconsider the necessities for life. 

41 notes

ohscience:

heart

I have never seen this view of the heart before.

ohscience:

heart

I have never seen this view of the heart before.

42 notes

poculum:

Size of a blue whale’s heart

It took me forever to find the scale reference before I noticed the dude standing there…

/mindblown

poculum:

Size of a blue whale’s heart

It took me forever to find the scale reference before I noticed the dude standing there…

/mindblown

(via poculum-deactivated20120319)

236 notes

myneutralterritory:

Before we are born our heart has a hole in it. When we are born our first breath causes this hole in our heart to close over, redirecting blood to the lungs to be oxygenated and kick starting our lives as a living, breathing human being.  
If a single breath is so powerful, imagine the potential you have as an entire person. 

science + poetic words = apoetwhoisalsoascientistjusthadherheartturnedtomush

myneutralterritory:

Before we are born our heart has a hole in it. When we are born our first breath causes this hole in our heart to close over, redirecting blood to the lungs to be oxygenated and kick starting our lives as a living, breathing human being. 
 

If a single breath is so powerful, imagine the potential you have as an entire person. 

science + poetic words = apoetwhoisalsoascientistjusthadherheartturnedtomush

(via jennaanne01)

1,527 notes

theartofmedicine:

chordae tendenae

AWESOME. These are located inside your heart, anchoring the valves. :) 

theartofmedicine:

chordae tendenae

AWESOME. These are located inside your heart, anchoring the valves. :) 

(Source: Flickr / imnowl)

149 notes

This is really cute, and if you know anything about human anatomy, this is extremely amusing. My favorites are the pineal gland and the spleen. :D

This is really cute, and if you know anything about human anatomy, this is extremely amusing. My favorites are the pineal gland and the spleen. :D

(Source: bakatsuna)

702 notes