fuckyeahtattoos:

This is my first and only tattoo. It’s of Darwin’s famous finches, but with their beaks turned toward one another, forming a sort of butterfly. I am an undergraduate biology major and this tattoo symbolizes my adoration for evolution and the natural sciences as well as my respect for Charles Darwin’s genius. The tattoo was done by Liaa Walter at British Ink in Washington, DC. She is wonderful and I plan on having more work done by her!

niiiice.

fuckyeahtattoos:

This is my first and only tattoo. It’s of Darwin’s famous finches, but with their beaks turned toward one another, forming a sort of butterfly. I am an undergraduate biology major and this tattoo symbolizes my adoration for evolution and the natural sciences as well as my respect for Charles Darwin’s genius. The tattoo was done by Liaa Walter at British Ink in Washington, DC. She is wonderful and I plan on having more work done by her!

niiiice.

1,116 notes

Pictured: Emperor Scorpion carrying her babies. 

Scorpions are one of the few species of arachnids that give birth to live young instead of laying eggs. For the first few weeks of life, or until their first molting, the scorplings ride on their mother`s back for protection. Scorpions can have upwards of a dozen babies at a time, and far from being traditional maternal figures, the female scorpion will sometimes eat a few of her offspring to supplement her own nutrition. 

Submitted by Solongtodevotion

19 notes

theruralkincardineadvantage:

Earthworm Jim.

Ahahhahaa! I love it!
- nerd

theruralkincardineadvantage:

Earthworm Jim.

Ahahhahaa! I love it!

- nerd

12 notes

ilovecharts:

How Honey is Made
Had to research and create this for class.  Learned to flow chart with the best of them.
-magaloops

ilovecharts:

How Honey is Made

Had to research and create this for class.  Learned to flow chart with the best of them.

-magaloops

127 notes

ohscience:

Elephant weevil - Orthorhinus cylindrirostris 
FAMILY CURCULIONIDAE
(submitted by argute-kibitzer)

ohscience:

Elephant weevil - Orthorhinus cylindrirostris 

FAMILY CURCULIONIDAE

(submitted by argute-kibitzer)

146 notes

ohscience:

King penguins have such a long breeding cycle that it does not fit in a single year. The chick hatches in spring/summer and is well-fed by its parents until it reaches a size of 10-12kg, at which point winter arrives and the parents leave to feed at sea for three to four months. The chick loses about 70% of its body mass during this fast.
(image from wikipedia)
(submitted by fuckyeahbiomajorplanarian)

ohscience:

King penguins have such a long breeding cycle that it does not fit in a single year. The chick hatches in spring/summer and is well-fed by its parents until it reaches a size of 10-12kg, at which point winter arrives and the parents leave to feed at sea for three to four months. The chick loses about 70% of its body mass during this fast.

(image from wikipedia)

(submitted by fuckyeahbiomajorplanarian)

110 notes

ohscience:

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Synthase is a protein which converts the potential energy of an electrochemical Hydrogen ion gradient into the ATP energy currency, which is used in countless metabolic reactions in the cell.  
Hydrogen ions enter the proton channel (blue), and cause the axle (cyan) to rotate.  Axel rotation inside the F1 subunit (red) causes an ADP molecule to bind to a phosphate molecule, forming ATP.  The Stator (orange) holds the F1 subunit in place.  The axle completes between 100 and 600 rotations per second.  There are on the order of 10^20 (One Hundred Billion Billion) ATP synthase molecules in your body.
Illustration from The Machinery of Life by David S. Goodsell.
(submitted by infinity-imagined)

ohscience:

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Synthase is a protein which converts the potential energy of an electrochemical Hydrogen ion gradient into the ATP energy currency, which is used in countless metabolic reactions in the cell.  

Hydrogen ions enter the proton channel (blue), and cause the axle (cyan) to rotate.  Axel rotation inside the F1 subunit (red) causes an ADP molecule to bind to a phosphate molecule, forming ATP.  The Stator (orange) holds the F1 subunit in place.  The axle completes between 100 and 600 rotations per second.  There are on the order of 10^20 (One Hundred Billion Billion) ATP synthase molecules in your body.

Illustration from The Machinery of Life by David S. Goodsell.

(submitted by infinity-imagined)

236 notes


How to tell the difference #2!
Telling the difference between an African and Asian elephant is quite easy, here are some of the main morphological differences:
African elephant’s have large ears that go past their necks - Asian elephants have small ears.
African elephants have a smooth rounded forehead - Asian elephants have two large bumps on their forehead.
African elephants have a concave back - Asian elephants have a convex or straight back.
Check out the linked website for more interesting differences!

How to tell the difference #2!

Telling the difference between an African and Asian elephant is quite easy, here are some of the main morphological differences:

African elephant’s have large ears that go past their necks - Asian elephants have small ears.

African elephants have a smooth rounded forehead - Asian elephants have two large bumps on their forehead.

African elephants have a concave back - Asian elephants have a convex or straight back.

Check out the linked website for more interesting differences!

So here’s the start of a series I would like to do called “How Do You Tell The Difference?” Let’s get started…
How do you tell the difference between a cheetah and a leopard?
Both animals share a similar geographic range, but there are a few key features which can help you distinguish them:
Cheetah’s have simple spots. Leopards have ‘rosette’ type spots.
Cheetah’s hunt during the day. Leopards hunt during the night.
Cheetah’s have tear lines from their eyes to their mouth. Leopards do not.
Don’t worry about confusing these guys with jaguars - those are only found in neotropical regions!

So here’s the start of a series I would like to do called “How Do You Tell The Difference?” Let’s get started…

How do you tell the difference between a cheetah and a leopard?

Both animals share a similar geographic range, but there are a few key features which can help you distinguish them:

Cheetah’s have simple spots. Leopards have ‘rosette’ type spots.

Cheetah’s hunt during the day. Leopards hunt during the night.

Cheetah’s have tear lines from their eyes to their mouth. Leopards do not.

Don’t worry about confusing these guys with jaguars - those are only found in neotropical regions!

6 notes

The Jungle Babbler

Known as Turdoides striata. These bird are found in Southeast Asia. They are commonly known as the Seven Sisters because they forage in a group of six to ten.

Photo taken by: Me